Tuesday, January 31, 2006

"Lost Boy" from Sudan Killed in Pittsburgh

In December 2000, David Agar left a refugee camp in Kenya after living there for 9 years, and came to America. He had fled war torn Sudan, trekking 8 months to escape Sudanese government soldiers according to an article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette written by Steve Levin ("Lost Boy" from Sudan, who found himself in America, killed on Uptown Street, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 31 January 2006). 3 days ago, he died -- shot to death in an apparent robbery.
What a sad story. He had dreams -- "plans" as Levin writes. After enduring so much hardship, it seems so unfair. If anything, David Agar's story helps put into perspective our insignificant day-to-day complaining. See the entire story below...

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06031/646995.stm

4 comments:

stacy h said...

It's unbelievable when people come to America seeking a safe haven, certain their lives will be much better, but have their life suddenly come to an end. Mr. Agar's story is tragic and distressing. For those fleeing their home countries, the challanges do not seize once they are outside its borders. The challanges can continue all the way into the U.S. and remain with a person forever. That is where people need help. It's one thing to be granted protection by a country, but it's another to actually provide it. It seems like Mr. Agar was a victim of what he was actually trying to flee from to begin with.

Dr. D said...

Ironically, one of the Sundance Films to win an award, was the recent film about Sudanese "lost boys" called "God Grew Tired of Us", a story about the "lost boys of Sudan".

zahra said...

it is sad when you think about how immigrants live here in the US. immigrants usually work like dogs, live in terrible living conditions - all in this lovely america - the land of the free. i get so frustrated when i hear stories about a refugee or animmigrant who has been struggling to come here, and then face similarly tragic events. i wish more could be done for these people.

don said...

You know, I was walking in the mall last week and as I was walking by the escalator near Bonton's, I heard a group of 4 individuals looking at a spot on the floor, looking at the celing, pointing to the escalatory, and saying, "Oh, there's her hand print where she fell [from the ceiling]." For split second, I just kinda stuttered stepped and for a while (about 5 minutes), I thought about just how short and cold and uncaring life can be. Here I was surrounded by hundreds of people in the mall and no one knew that just a few days back a woman had fallen to her death in a spot people walk by everyday. I was reminded of the memory with the Sudanese story. I was reminded that even when we reflect, ponder, and feel how sad we are to realize that something like this happened, most of us don't really care or don't really know. Is it because if we knew everything we ourselves would be overloaded, burdened? Is it because we don't care or if we do, only for a few minutes? Like I did for for that woman who fell? I realized that I'll go through much of my life unaware of much of the world around me. And no, I'm not talking about the big "headline" stories or anything like that...but rather the stories of people who are unknown, unseen, and "un-remembered." Talk about sad...that's downright depressing for me.