Sunday, December 03, 2006

Chavez coasts, human rights abuses continue

"Venezuela is one of the most violent countries in the world" said a researcher from UNESCO who conducted a crime study in the nation recently. Venezuela had the highest gun-related deaths of all 57 nations surveyed. Homicides are up 67% since 1999 and Chavez still seems cozy.
Experts say that this is possible since Chavez's policies have made a good deal of difference in the lives of his people. Ironically, however, the people who are worst affected by crimes are the poor in Venezuela, who also make up Chavez political base. The crimes against the rich are recognized. However, when the poor are killed, or injured, it often goes unnoticed.
Chavez's opponent in the upcoming elections is taking a stand on this issue and is making it a concern for the people.

3 comments:

stacy h said...

Too bad Chavez actually won the election. His words to the masses, "It's another defeat for the devil, who tries to dominate the world. Down with imperialism! We need a new world!" demonstrate how sad it is he was actually re-elected. It's also sad that Citgo basically belongs to Chavez. Should we be afraid of him?

Ozymandias said...

In the past, the U.S. has had few scruples about taking down Latin American dictators with whom we've disagreed. This was done under the guise of "stopping international Communism", or something similar. I wonder if this program will continue in the post-Cold War era, and what reason we'll use now. It would be sort of nice if our country's leadership would be hones and say they were doing it for the oil and bananna companies...

sms said...

My first instinct when I heard about Chavez’s victory was to accuse the Venezuelan government of corruption. What’s the use of winning 61% of the vote if Chavez stations soldiers at the polling stations to sway the vote? However, after reading an article on the Venezuelan elections, I found that international observers throughout the country said that the election took place without evidence of wrongdoing. When rationalizing why people would vote in Chavez for another term, I realized that when things are not going quite right, people lean towards a strong leader who promises to take care of them. This is exactly what Chavez has been doing. Chavez favors the social revolution and consequently, has redirected social spending to an array of social welfare programs that benefit the poor. In response to the blog, yes – the poor may be affected the worst by crime, but I feel that Chavez is making it seem to them that he is their biggest advocate.
Here’s the article I’m referring to:
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/04/world/americas/04venezuela.html?_r=1&oref=slogin